Intermittent Fasting – “It prevents cardiovascular disease; it slows down aging.” {VIDEO]

Hat Tip to CHD TV: https://live.childrenshealthdefense.org/

The Amazing Healing Power of Intermittent Fasting – “It prevents cardiovascular disease; it slows down aging.”

In an interview with CHD, Dr. Paul Marik gave a powerful 4-minute lesson on fasting, its benefits, and how one can use this practice to get rid of spike protein, treat, and prevent all sorts of diseases.

“The host depends on itself to heal itself … and the way the body gets rid of spike… is a process called autophagy. And autophagy is an evolutionary preserved response; it goes back to the fruit fly, where the cell basically develops what’s called an autophagosome. So, it puts these foreign and misfolded proteins and little vesicles in the cell that fuses with the lysosome … which breaks down these bad proteins. It’s like a garbage truck. It’s like filling the garbage truck with garbage and getting rid of the garbage.”

Interesting analogy. Is there any other way to get rid of spike protein?

“And this is the only way to get rid of spike. There is no other way … There are a number of studies that have shown that with long COVID or with vaccine-injured people have circulating spike for up to 15 months, and so you’ve got to get rid of spike. And the best way is by stimulating autophagy. It’s the body’s protective mechanism. It’s its own garbage truck to get rid of this garbage in the cell.”

There are a number of ways to stimulate autophagy, but the best way, as explained by Dr. Paul Marik, is through intermittent fasting.

“So part of the problem with modern society is that we eat all the time, we snack all the time, we eat bad foods, and that actually switches off autophagy. The best way to activate autophagy is to do intermittent fasting or daily fasting. And it’s actually not that difficult to do because it’s a natural mechanism.

And so there are a number of ways of doing it. And you know, there’s a very good book by Jason Fung on The Complete Guide to Intermittent Fasting. It’s a very easy read. It’s a very good book, and we have some recommendations on our website.

So there are a number of ways to do it. The simplest is just reduce your eating time between two to four hours, and the rest of the time, you fast.

And what happens is it induces ketosis, so you actually don’t become hungry. It gives you a lot of energy, and it has enormous benefits apart from its effect on COVID. It’s been shown to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, to prevent Parkinson’s disease. It prevents cardiovascular disease; it slows down aging, [and] it causes what’s called an extension of health span, so people live longer but healthier lives. So this is a very important manoeuvre that people can do to improve their overall health.”

Incredible. Everyone, not just long-haul or vaccine-injured people, can benefit from this practice, so why is this not being shouted from the rooftops?

“Big pharma and the agencies don’t want to tell you this because how can you make money from this?”

Of course. Makes perfect sense. Dr. Paul Marik then gives a powerful testimonial on how intermittent fasting has benefitted his own health.

So I can tell you my personal experience. I was a type 2 diabetic, been struggling for maybe 20 years. I’ve now been doing this intermittent fasting, I’ve changed my diet, I’ve stopped snacking, I eat wholesome food, I’ve lost 25 pounds, and my glucose control is not better than it’s ever been. Ever been!

So this is for people who are overweight, who have type 2 diabetes, who have hypertension. And also, it’s very good for aging! People want to age gracefully and maintain their cognitive capacity.

Great Reset Is ‘a Project of Extermination’ [VIDEO]

On the latest episode of Russell Brand’s “Under the Skin” podcast, Indian scholar, environmental activist and food sovereignty advocate, Vandana Shiva, explained how the economic plan known as the Great Reset is a “project of extermination.” Continue reading “Great Reset Is ‘a Project of Extermination’ [VIDEO]”

Therapy Apps, Do They Really Protect Your Privacy?

Therapy: Therapy Jokes

Text-based therapy and mental health apps like Talkspace, MindDoc, and (perhaps the most well-known) BetterHelp, offer major benefits. These apps are typically more affordable and certainly more convenient compared to in-person appointments. But in 2020, Jezebel reporters investigated the “loosely regulated world of online therapy,”

Article: https://lifehacker.com/do-therapy-apps-really-protect-your-privacy-1847983029

pets know when their owners need emotional support the most – psychologist

 

In a study conducted in the year 2016 explored the significant participation of pets in the social networks of people managing a long-term mental health problem such as depression. In the same study, it has been discovered that pets can give a sense of security and emotional and social support to their owners who are suffering from depression.

“A pet can remind you that you’re not alone,” Desiree Wiercyski, a life coach in Fort Wayne, explained how pets can improve ones mood. “Pets offer unconditional love, which can be extraordinarily soothing when feeling isolated.”

According to a research conducted in State University of New York in the year 2002, being around with a pet relieves stress more than being with a spouse, family, or friend. In addition, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention believes that having a pet is beneficial especially to people who have hypertension. “If you have a dog around, your blood pressure is lower,” Marty Becker, a veterinary consultant for Good Morning America said.

But aside from these physical benefits that taking care of a pet can bring to one’s health. There are numerous studies showing that being surrounded with companion animals is good for improving ones mental health as well.

Read Much More Here: https://positiveoutlooksblog.com/pet-relieves-stress

 

Stop Checking Your Phone And Start Using It With Intention….

A couple weeks ago, I recognized I had fallen into a dangerous loop and that my phone use —especially the time spent checking email and social media feeds — was out of hand.

So I did something about it.

I didn’t take a “digital detox” and completely abandon social media for a brief period of time because that feels more like a temporary treatment than an actual solution.

I might have felt better for a couple days, but once I returned from my detox I assume everything else would have gone back to “normal” — and normal wasn’t working for me.

Instead, I set out to change my phone habits and create a simple set of rules to limit the negative (and amplify the positive) impacts of when and how I use my phone.

What I came up with was a set of guidelines to ensure I used my phone with more intention.

These 10 rules turned out to be relatively easy to follow and made a huge difference in how often I check my phone, what I get out of it, and how I feel about it.

1. I stopped checking my phone in my car.

I never really checked my phone while driving because that’s super dangerous (and you should definitely stop that whether you try out these rules or not), but with this rule I also outlawed checking it at stoplights, in heavy traffic, or any time I was in my car.

By implementing this rule I discovered how often I actually was checking my phone in the car previously, how unnecessary it was, and how it actually made things like sitting in traffic more frustrating than they otherwise might be.

2. I stopped checking my phone during TV commercials.

I hate commercials as much as the next guy and sometimes social media seems like it was solely invented to fill up those two minute interruptions — no wonder I checked my phone at every TV timeout.

It may seem harmless to check our phone during a commercial, but I realized that’s not the case.

Because when I picked up my phone during a commercial, I rarely put it back down when the show came back on —it captured my attention and drew it away from what I actually wanted to watch.

To help me stick with this rule, I implemented another one…

3. I kept my phone across the room when I wasn’t using it.

A funny thing happened when I sat down to watch TV (or do anything) and knew I wasn’t going to use my phone during that time —I realized I didn’t even need to have my phone near me.

When I watch TV now, I keep my phone on a table across the room so I’m never tempted to pick it up. Turns out the only thing stronger than the allure of social networks is the allure of not getting up off the couch.

The further my phone is from me, the less likely I am to randomly check it. This rule helps make following the other rules easier.

Another rule that helps with that is…

4. I turned off all notifications.

This one was easy for me because it’s a rule I adopted a long time ago and love.

I turn off all notifications on my phone — there are no dings when somebody likes my Facebook post or sends me an email.

Notifications are unnecessary and they’re poison. If we enable them, we are asking our phones to interrupt us. Don’t do it.

Continue reading “Stop Checking Your Phone And Start Using It With Intention….”

A chance for social bonding with a Camp Fire Chat…

The evolution of fire may have had major social impacts, as well as transforming our diet, according to new research.

Research among the Bushmen of the Kalahari has found sitting around a campfire at night enables conversations, storytelling, and social bonding that rarely happens during daylight.

Study author Dr Polly Wiessner, professor of anthropology at the University of Utah , analysed the content of 174 recorded or documented day and nighttime conversations among the Bushmen, as well as 68 other translated texts.

“I found this really fascinating difference between conversations by firelight and conversations in the day,” says Wiessner, whose research is published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

While daytime talk tended to focus on economic matters and gossip, at night around the campfire, the conversation shifted away from the day-to-day tensions and towards singing, dancing, religious ceremonies and storytelling, and chat about common acquaintances.

“The day is harsh, you see the realities, you see the facial expressions, there’s work to be done, and there’s social regulation, and at night people kind of mellow out,” Wiessner says.

While evolutionary study of the impact of fire has long focused on the physiological changes associated with cooking of food, Wiessner was more interested in its social impact.

“The day is productive time for hunting and gathering and the firelight changed our circadian rhythm, so we stayed awake much longer and it gave a whole new time and space, and it was a time when no work could be done,” she says.

“I think it had an impact on our cognitive evolution; the stories are told in wonderful language, perhaps increasing linguistic skills and the imagination . . . when you’re out in the dark by a fire, so many of the stimuli are shut out and your imagination then takes off.”

The conversations also seem to serve an important social function, with discussion of far-flung acquaintances both alive and dead, that can serve to reinforce that broader social network, says Wiessner.

“A bushman with widespread networks, they see this as their broader community but actually these aren’t contiguous in space and sometimes even include people you don’t know very well.”

Impact of artificial light

The development of artificial lighting may have pushed the campfire out of our lives, but Wiessner says we still sometimes try to recreate that atmosphere.

“Even in our society, we love our fireplaces, in our restaurants we have candlelight, we often do a lot to change our environment to bring about the mood that stimulates intimacy, bonding, and imagination.”

However the development of artificial lighting and computers also means that those night-time hours when, in the past we would have been engaged in social bonding, we now often see those hours as an extension of daylight work time.

“For many people now artificial light has turned what were social hours into really productive hours,” says Wiessner.

“We sit there at the computer, we write, we feel we can continue to get work done, and we don’t get the social work done, we don’t spend nearly as much time with people, so the question is, when artificial light turns social time into productive time, what happens?”

Source: http://www.abc.net.au